The Dramatic Tyrannosaur

ted:

What can we learn from galaxies far, far away?

Galaxy clusters like this are astoundingly big, beautiful, mysterious—and also very useful. For scientists, they’re giant laboratories. They help us understand the mysteries of astrophysics, including dark matter, dark energy, and the balance of heating and cooling in the universe’s most massive objects.

Thanks for the cool pictures, NASA ;).

Watch the full talk here »

We are the local embodiment of a Cosmos grown to selfawareness. We have begun to contemplate our origins: starstuff pondering the stars; organized assemblages of ten billion billion billion atoms considering the evolution of atoms; tracing the long journey by which, here at least, consciousness arose. Our loyalties are to the species and the planet. We speak for Earth. Our obligation to survive is owed not just to ourselves but also to that Cosmos, ancient and vast, from which we spring.
Carl Sagan, Cosmos: p.339
Wikiquote (via mucholderthen)
thatscienceguy:

The Electric Eel (Electrophorus electricus) is truly a wonder of the animal kingdom, and an amazing work of millions of years of evolution.
Despite its name it is in no way closely related to eels, it is a member of the Knifefish family and is the only member of its genus. The electric eel lives in fresh water in the Amazon, as well as other river basins in south america. They can grow to about 2m in length (6 and a half feet) weighing 20 kg. It can produce an electric shock of up to 600 Volts!
It produces this shock using 3 organs, the Main organ, the Hunters organ, and the Sachs organ. The total size of these 3 organs make up an amazing four fifths of the eels body! The organs are made of electrocytes, and are lined up so that a current can be passed from one organ to the next. When the eel wants to produce a shock it opens up glands in and between the organs allowing sodium ions to flow between them, creating a sudden change in potential difference (voltage.)
The shock only lasts approximately 0.2 milliseconds meaning it is not very likely to be lethal to an adult human despite it being 600 volts. That being said, it has been known to kill if the shock is, for example, directed towards the heart. 

thatscienceguy:

The Electric Eel (Electrophorus electricus) is truly a wonder of the animal kingdom, and an amazing work of millions of years of evolution.

Despite its name it is in no way closely related to eels, it is a member of the Knifefish family and is the only member of its genus. The electric eel lives in fresh water in the Amazon, as well as other river basins in south america. They can grow to about 2m in length (6 and a half feet) weighing 20 kg. It can produce an electric shock of up to 600 Volts!

It produces this shock using 3 organs, the Main organ, the Hunters organ, and the Sachs organ. The total size of these 3 organs make up an amazing four fifths of the eels body! The organs are made of electrocytes, and are lined up so that a current can be passed from one organ to the next. When the eel wants to produce a shock it opens up glands in and between the organs allowing sodium ions to flow between them, creating a sudden change in potential difference (voltage.)

The shock only lasts approximately 0.2 milliseconds meaning it is not very likely to be lethal to an adult human despite it being 600 volts. That being said, it has been known to kill if the shock is, for example, directed towards the heart. 

megacosms:

Herschel Crater on Mimas of Saturn Credit: Cassini Imaging Team, ISS, JPL, ESA, NASA
Explanation: Why is this giant crater on Mimas oddly colored? Mimas, one of the smaller round moons of Saturn, sports Herschel crater, one of the larger impact craters in the entire Solar System. The robotic Cassini spacecraft now orbiting Saturn took the above image of Herschel crater in unprecedented detail while making a 10,000-kilometer record close pass by the icy world just over one month ago. Shown in contrast-enhanced false color, the above image includes color information from older Mimas images that together show more clearly that Herschel’s landscape is colored slightly differently from moreheavily cratered terrain nearby. The color difference could yield surface composition clues to the violent history of Mimas. An impact on Mimas much larger than the one that created the 130-kilometer Herschel would likely have destroyed the entire world.

megacosms:

Herschel Crater on Mimas of Saturn 
Credit: Cassini Imaging TeamISSJPLESANASA

Explanation: Why is this giant crater on Mimas oddly colored? Mimas, one of the smaller round moons of Saturn, sports Herschel crater, one of the larger impact craters in the entire Solar System. The robotic Cassini spacecraft now orbiting Saturn took the above image of Herschel crater in unprecedented detail while making a 10,000-kilometer record close pass by the icy world just over one month ago. Shown in contrast-enhanced false color, the above image includes color information from older Mimas images that together show more clearly that Herschel’s landscape is colored slightly differently from moreheavily cratered terrain nearby. The color difference could yield surface composition clues to the violent history of Mimas. An impact on Mimas much larger than the one that created the 130-kilometer Herschel would likely have destroyed the entire world.

policymic:

These Fortune 500 companies have spent more on lobbyists than taxes
Follow policymic
birdsonly:

Rainbow Lorikeet ~ Allfarblori ~ Trichoglossus haematodus
Have I menationed that Lorikeets are loud and kind of evil? ;-)
2014 © Jesse Alveo

birdsonly:

Rainbow Lorikeet ~ Allfarblori ~ Trichoglossus haematodus

Have I menationed that Lorikeets are loud and kind of evil? ;-)

2014 © Jesse Alveo

mosaicrecords:

Benny Goodman Quartet: The World is Waiting for the Sunrise

From the 1944 flick “Sweet And Lowdown” comes this outstanding version of “The World Is Waiting For The Sunrise” (co-written by the great character actor Gene Lockhart) featuring the Benny Goodman Quartet (Sid Weiss, Morey Feld and some great work by Jess Stacy).

-Scott Wezel



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fairy-wren:

(via 500px / Golden Breased Starling by Milan Zygmunt)
sinobug:

Notodontid Moth (Syntypistis sp., Notodontidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

sinobug:

Notodontid Moth (Syntypistis sp., Notodontidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese moths on my Flickr site HERE…..

somuchscience:

asapscience:

How to use the sun to tell time when you’re in survival mode. via Quora

WHOA FALSE! This drastically changes with latitude AND the time of year.
So first, if you are in the Northern Hemisphere, estimate your latitude using Polaris, the North Star.
Next, if it is either the vernal or autumnal equinox, then you know, at noon, the sun will be precisely “90 degrees minus your latitude” degrees above the horizon. Then, using your fingers and fist (2.5 and 10 degrees respectively) you can estimate the sun’s position in the sky relative to noon, and since it is equinox, you know that there are precisely 12 hours of daylight and 12 hours of night.
Now, it seems very unlikely that you would require this sort of “survival” information on equinox, so what would you do then?
Well, since you know that on the solstice, the sun will either be 24 degrees higher or lower (depending on if it is winter or summer) than it was at equinox, you can estimate how high it should be at noon given your relative position in the year between equinox and solstice.
Or you could construct a sun dial and do some simple trigonometry…
So yeah, just wear a watch.

somuchscience:

asapscience:

How to use the sun to tell time when you’re in survival mode. 

via Quora

WHOA FALSE! This drastically changes with latitude AND the time of year.

So first, if you are in the Northern Hemisphere, estimate your latitude using Polaris, the North Star.

Next, if it is either the vernal or autumnal equinox, then you know, at noon, the sun will be precisely “90 degrees minus your latitude” degrees above the horizon. Then, using your fingers and fist (2.5 and 10 degrees respectively) you can estimate the sun’s position in the sky relative to noon, and since it is equinox, you know that there are precisely 12 hours of daylight and 12 hours of night.

Now, it seems very unlikely that you would require this sort of “survival” information on equinox, so what would you do then?

Well, since you know that on the solstice, the sun will either be 24 degrees higher or lower (depending on if it is winter or summer) than it was at equinox, you can estimate how high it should be at noon given your relative position in the year between equinox and solstice.

Or you could construct a sun dial and do some simple trigonometry…

So yeah, just wear a watch.